Manual:Network/WAN

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Interfaces – WAN

The Network ➤ Interfaces ➤ WAN page configures the interface for the WAN zone.

Common Configuration

General Setup

Status: Shows a summary of the interface for the WAN zone. This includes uptime, MAC address, bytes and packets received by the device, bytes and packets transmitted by the device, and its IPv4 address.

CpxWRT Network Status.png

Protocol: Chooses between DHCP client (default), where the device obtains it IP address automatically, or Static address, where you can specify the device IP address. Other protocols are PPTP, PPPoE, and L2TP.

Protocol Static address

IPv4 address: Sets the IP address of the device as seen from the WAN zone.

IPv4 netmask: Sets the subnet mask e.g. 255.255.255.0. The IP address and netmask together determine the subnet or network ID e.g. 192.168.3.0/24. Two devices must be in the same subnet in order to establish a (Layer 2) link between them.

IPv4 gateway: Specifies the IP address of the remote router that allows the device's shell to gain internet access.

IPv4 broadcast: Specifies the IPv4 broadcast address, optional.

Use custom DNS servers: Configures the IP address of the DNS servers e.g. 165.21.100.88 for the SingNet DNS server in Singapore or 8.8.8.8 for the Google DNS server in the USA. The computers in the same subnet as this device can then set this device's IP address as their preferred DNS server to obtain the same DNS service.

Protocol DHCP client

The Dynamic Host Configuration Protocol (DHCP) is a standardized networking protocol used by servers on an IP network to allocate IP addresses automatically to client devices.

Hostname to send when requesting DHCP: Specifies the name of this device as seen by the remote DHCP server.

Protocol PPTP

The Point-to-Point Tunneling Protocol (PPTP) is a method for implementing virtual private networks. PPTP uses a control channel over Transmission Control Protocol (TCP) and a Generic Routing Encapsulation (GRE) tunnel operating to encapsulate Point-to-Point Protocol (PPP) packets.

VPN Server: Specifies the IP address of the remote PPTP server for the virtual private network (VPN).

PAP/CHAP username: Sets the username for the Password Authentication Protocol (PAP) or the Challenge-Handshake Authentication Protocol (CHAP).

PAP/CHAP password: Sets the password for the PAP or CHAP.

Configure PPTP IP settings: Upon clicking the “Configure...” button, the PPTP Common Configuration page would be displayed. The protocol DHCP client or Static address can be selected. The corresponding options are explained within this section (5.1.1 Common Configuration).

Protocol PPPoE

The Point-to-Point Protocol over Ethernet (PPPoE) is a network protocol for encapsulating PPP frames inside Ethernet frames. Most DSL providers use PPPoE, which provides authentication, encryption, and compression.

The options PAP/CHAP username and PAP/CHAP password have been explained earlier.

Access Concentrator: Identifies the PPPoE server. Leave empty to autodetect.

Service Name: Specifies the PPPoE service name. The server will accept clients which send an initialization message with the service name that matches the server's configuration. Leave empty to autodetect.

Protocol L2TP

The Layer 2 Tunneling Protocol (L2TP) is a tunneling protocol used to support virtual private networks (VPNs) or as part of the delivery of services by ISPs. It does not provide any encryption or confidentiality by itself. Rather, it relies on an encryption protocol that it passes within the tunnel to provide privacy.

The options PAP/CHAP username and PAP/CHAP password have been explained earlier.

L2TP Server: Specifies the IP address of the remote L2TP server.

Configure L2TP IP settings: Upon clicking the “Configure...” button, the L2TP Common Configuration page would be displayed. The protocol DHCP client or Static address can be selected. The corresponding options are explained within this section #Common Configuration.

Advanced Settings

The following are options in the Advanced Settings section tab. Some of these options are shown, depending on the protocol being used.

Override MAC address: Allows you to specify a different MAC address other than the router's original MAC address. This is useful if the ISP uses the MAC address of a router to identify a customer. Suppose that the router needs to be replaced. The new router can take on the MAC address of the previous router in order to continue having internet access.

Override MTU: Sets the maximum transmission unit (MTU), the default being 1500 bytes. Unless, your ISP requires, it is not recommended to change this setting.

Use gateway metric: Allows you to specify a gateway metric. This acts as a cost for choosing the gateway when a connected device has to select between multiple available gateways. The gateway with the smallest metric is chosen.

Use broadcast flag: When sending DHCP requests, a client can indicate if it wants an answer in unicast or broadcast, by setting the broadcast flag. This is required for certain ISPs. Unchecked by default.

Use default gateway: Configures a default route. Checked by default. Use DNS servers advertised by peer: Uses the DNS settings advertised by the DHCP server. Checked by default.

Client ID to send when requesting DHCP: Sets the identifier that may be required by the ISP or network administrator. If not stated, the MAC address of the client will be sent.

Vendor Class to send when requesting DHCP: Identifies the vendor of a DHCP client for the enhancement of vendor-specific DHCP functionality.

The following three options are specific to the PPTP and PPPoE protocols:

LCP echo failure threshold: Sets the number of link control protocol (LCP) echo failures before the peer is presumed to be dead. Use 0 to ignore failures. LCP echo interval: Specifies the interval in seconds to send LCP echo requests. This is only effective in conjunction with failure threshold. Inactivity timeout: Sets the number of seconds of inactivity, after which the connection is closed. Use 0 to persist connection.

Physical Settings

Interface: Chooses which physical interface to use for the WAN zone. This can be the Ethernet Adapter “eth0” or “eth1” that corresponds to each of the two ports on the device for example. It could also be set as the Wireless Network. If there is a physical interface selected for the WAN zone, this can be referred to as the “NAT mode”, because network address translation occurs between the WAN zone and the LAN zone.

If No Interface is selected for the WAN zone, all interfaces would be within the LAN zone. This may also be referred to as the “Bridge Mode”.

Note: For boards with 2 Ethernet ports, the port further away from the DC Jack is for the eth0 interface (PoE in port). The port nearer to the DC Jack is for the eth1 interface. For older boards/firmwares, the eth0 interface is for the LAN port. The eth1 interface for is the WAN port. For current boards/firmwares, both ports would be LAN ports in the default configuration. You can still designate either eth0 or eth1 for the WAN port in the firmware. For newer boards/firmwares with Power over Ethernet (PoE), only the port nearer to the DC Jack (ethX) would be the PoE output port. Either of the two ports (ethX or ethY) can be used as the PoE input port.